Description

The idea of three-minute lectures comes from a formulation of what we call 'conversational formats' in psychotherapy. Conversational formats are simply different sorts of conventions, you might say, about what's going on in a conversation. In psychotherapy, you do it primarily in an ordinary conversational format, and you would be surprised how many norms there are associated with ordinary conversation. Because there are, if you want to violate that and go to something else for some special reason, then you generally need to set the stage and somehow announce or demonstrate or introduce the idea that you are now, in a different mode. Among the conversational formats are things like ordinary conversation, soliloquy, confessions, pantomime, and three-minute lectures. Three-minute lectures, you have recourse to when the client has some misconception about something that is important to be straight about, and since the client is merely missing or has the wrong idea, you go to a didactic mode, and since you go to a didactic mode, you announce it, in effect or literally. Sometimes I say, 'Let me give you a three-minute lecture on such and such'. So you introduce the notion that you're going to do something didactic, and then you can do it and get away with it, but you've got to keep it short. And that's why I give three-minute lectures and not fifteen-minute lectures or ten-minute lectures, etc. Actually, they vary in length. [laughter] Have you ever heard, a ten-minute three-minute lecture? Anyhow, the idea is that you really can't get by giving long lectures in therapy. They've got to be kept short, but you can do that. So these are three-minute lectures; and they are about emotions because emotions are one of the primary things that clients have misconceptions about, that their ideas about emotions create problems for them. Even if they didn't have enough already, the way they understand emotions and how they work create extra problems. So emotions are probably the single topic From the Society for Descriptive Psychology's Eighth Annual Conference, August 17-20, 1986.

Date Created

Spring 8-18-1986

Publisher

The Society for Descriptive Psychology Eigth Annual Conference

Extent

21 pages; 10.56 x 8.08 inches

Document Type

Technical Report

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