Description

First let me review for you what a three-minute lecture is. You may recall, in Clinical Topics, one of the sections connected with the elements that go into psychotherapy is called 'conversational formats', and some of the items under 'conversational formats' are (1) ordinary conversation, (2) soliloquy, (3) provocation elicits perplexity, (4) pantomime or gesture, and (5) three-minute lectures. Now a three-minute lecture is simply any part of Descriptive Psychology I that you want a client to understand and use, and you take a didactic approach to it because that's about the only way you can present stuff like that and get it across. However, in conversation one does not give lectures. So you shift the format in any way you need to, to indicate that you are now going to do this strange thing, namely, a three-minute lecture. Usually I just say, 'Let me give you a three-minute lecture on such-and-such', and it's presented not as 'Here is the truth', but 'Here's some ideas that I'd like to have you try or that you might want to try, but they are certainly something you can try out'. I picked 'emotion', because emotion is probably the most common subject of three-minute lectures. There's more misunderstanding about emotions and how they work, particularly among clients although I think among the general population, than just about anything else. It also happens that you can't give half-hour lectures. You can give three-minute lectures; you can give five-minute lectures; sometimes you can get away with a ten-minute lecture; but you cannot do a half-hour lecture. That means that if you've got something that takes more than the three minutes, you've got to break it up into some number of them, and usually I will not do more than two in one session, and if I have to go more than that, I'll wait till the next session, review, and then present another piece. It turns out that there are a fair number of these, because the emotions are a fairly complex topic. You can see, I've listed sixteen, but some of those have several things associated with them. So even if it did only take three minutes each, you can bet I'm not going to cover

Date Created

Spring 1986

Publisher

Linguistic Research Institute

Extent

21 pages; 10.67 x 8.38 inches

Document Type

Technical Report

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