Document Type

Article

Publication Date

10-2017

Publication Title

Journal of Musicological Research

ISSN

1547-7304

Volume

36

Issue

4

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1080/01411896.2017.1379820

Abstract

In Act 4, scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare used the rhetorical figure of catachresis to capture the meta-theatrical thoughts of musicians as a way of expressing the “uncomfortable time” of Juliet’s apparent death on her wedding day. It is possible to trace Shakespeare’s source for the scene to O that most rare breast, William Byrd’s extensive dirge for Sir Philip Sidney. Not only does the song provide musical and funereal material, it also invites a writer’s response, as Byrd used a cross-disciplinary form of eristic imitation to outdo the rhetorical achievement of his text’s unnamed author.

Comments

This is a post-print version of an article published in the Journal of Musicological Research. You can access the publisher's version here.

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Available for download on Thursday, April 25, 2019

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