Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-1-2016

Publication Title

Advances in Physiology Education

ISSN

1522-1229

Volume

40

Issue

3

First Page

365

Last Page

369

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1152/advan.00183.2015

PubMed ID

27445287

Abstract

a major goal of graduate education is the development of students as “stewards of the discipline,” scholars who can create and preserve knowledge and responsibly translate it through writing, teaching, and practical applications (5). These qualities are consistent with the American Physiological Society's list of professional skills for physiologists and trainees (3). Key competencies on this list include building core biomedical knowledge, research/analytical abilities, and communication skills. By default, core knowledge and research aptitude are a central focus of most graduate physiology programs. As a result, there is significant interest in teaching strategies like active and problem-based learning (PBL) that enhance the development of these competencies (9, 14). However, communication skills often receive less emphasis, leaving many graduate students underequipped to effectively share their knowledge with the wider community (7, 13).

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