Undergraduate Honors Theses

Thesis Defended

Spring 2018

Document Type

Thesis

Type of Thesis

Departmental Honors

Department

Psychology & Neuroscience

First Advisor

Tiffany Ito

Abstract

Research suggests that musical interventions have the ability to illicit feelings of trust and cooperation, which can increase social connections. The current study examined the different effects of music exposure and synchrony of a musical intervention on interpersonal and intergroup attitudes. Subjects watched a video of either a White or Black individual drumming to music and either heard music or did not hear anything. On top of this, participants either did or did not drum in synchrony with the target presented. It was expected that individuals in the music and synchrony conditions would express more positive attitudes towards the drummer as well as increased self-other overlap with him. Additionally, it is expected that the effects of this condition will be more pronounced for participants who viewed a White target. However, for participants who viewed the Black target, it was expected that intergroup attitudes were expected to improve as well. Results indicated that exposure to synchrony alone can increase positive attitudes towards unknown individuals. The results also revealed that intergroup attitudes were somewhat effected by the intervention, but not drastically.

Keywords: musicality, synchrony, self-other overlap

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