Date of Award

Spring 1-1-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Asian Languages & Civilizations

First Advisor

Janice C. Brown

Second Advisor

Faye Y. Kleeman

Third Advisor

David C. Atherton

Abstract

This thesis examines a liminal contemporary subjective elucidated through a critical analysis of Azuma Hiroki's "Otaku: Japan's Database Animals" in conjunction with the investigation of Japan's contemporary media and literary character constructs. I deploy a re-structured (Ettingerian) psychoanalytic schema in order to extrapolate a proto-global archetype for an emergent-networked subject. This project critically engages the currently dominant (phallo-centric) psychoanalytic discourse regarding the discursive representation of contemporary Japanese characters, inhabiting popular media, mainstream culture, and literary venues, while concurrently attempting to codify the global significance of the resultant subject.

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