Document Type

Dissertation

Publication Date

Spring 4-25-1960

Abstract

The problem was to study the opinions of instructors in the home schools of nursing and the affiliate school of nursing concerning selected aspects of the orientation of basic students to the psychiatric affiliation. The purposes of the study were: to ascertain whether the instructors felt the orientation to the psychiatric affiliation should be done in the home school or in the affiliate school, to obtain suggestions regarding ways selected aspects of the orientation could be done in the home school, and to provide data which might be helpful to the schools in their psychiatric nursing orientation programs. The normative survey method was used, and the opinions obtained by the use of an open-ended questionnaire. Thirty-three instructors of the home schools of nursing and four instructors of the affiliate school of nursing responded to the questionnaire. Five aspects of the orientation were used in the study: students' feelings of insecurity on leaving the home school and beginning the new experience, students’ understanding of the role of the psychiatric nurse, students' feelings of aversion and prejudice toward mental illness, students' fear of the mentally ill patient, and students' understanding of the role of the nonprofessional personnel in the psychiatric hospital. The data were tabulated and classified into categories. Analysis showed that most instructors felt these selected aspects of orientation could be done in the home school by direct information given to the students by means of classes, conferences, and discussions between the students and instructor, or by the use of films or field trips.

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