Document Type

Dissertation

Publication Date

Spring 4-17-1962

Abstract

The purposes of this study were: (1) to identify the concepts of the behavioral sciences which were applicable to nursing care, (2) to develop a guide which contained a list of materials from which the nursing instructor could select those learning experiences which would enable the student to develop an understanding of the concepts of the behavioral sciences so that these concepts could be utilized in the promotion of health and the prevention of disease, and (3) to illustrate how these learning experiences could be organized to meet the criteria of sequence, continuity, and integration. A review of the literature from the fields of nursing, education, and the behavioral sciences was made for the purposes of: (1) establishing the need for understanding of human behavior in the promotion of health and the prevention of disease, (2) exploring the study of behavioral sciences as a route to understanding human behavior, (3) delimiting the broad categories of the concepts of the behavioral sciences as they relate to nursing, (4) establishing the validity of the resource unit, and (5) examining the contributions of a philosophy of education and a psychology of learning to the educational process. A review was also made of the statements of experts in nursing education and in the behavioral sciences concerning the criteria for the selection of the concepts. Based upon these statements, a grouping of the concepts was made into five basic categories which were related to nursing. With these five basic categories as the content dimension and understanding as the behavioral dimension, five objectives were formulated to serve as the basis for the guide. The guide developed in the study was designed for use in any basic preservice program in nursing that espoused a demographic philosophy. Clinical content areas representative of the basic preservice nursing curriculum were divided into three experience levels, and learning experiences were developed for each area. These learning experiences were organized for continuity, sequence and integration, illustrating both horizontal and vertical relationships. The learning experiences were planned to effect the stated objectives and to reflect the objectives of the clinical content area. Teaching materials accompanied each learning experience and reflected the objective, the level of learning, and the clinical area. Evaluation tools and methods were included in the learning experience and reflected the objective, the level of learning, and the clinical area. Evaluation tools and methods were included in the learning experiences and additional suggestions for evaluation of the attainment of the objectives were made. As a result of the study, it was recommended that the guide be used and evaluated by nursing instructors as a means of determining the effectiveness of the guide and that other areas in addition to the behavioral sciences be investigated as sources of developing increased understanding of human behavior by the basic preservice student.

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