Undergraduate Honors Theses

Thesis Defended

Spring 2011

Document Type

Thesis

Department

International Affairs

First Advisor

Jessica Martin PhD

Abstract

This research looks at the rhetoric of the Afghan political elite and public in order to see if there are differences in attitude toward foreigners between the two groups and also to determine whether this attitude has changed over time. This study concludes that the Afghan public has not demonstrated anti-foreign sentiment over the 20th and 21st century while the Afghan political elite tend to portray an anti-foreign view through their policies and rhetoric. Although the Afghan public has not been anti-foreign, the United States invaded Afghanistan in 2001 with the assumption that the Afghan public is anti-foreign. For this reason, it is important to determine if this assumption is warranted. This study exemplifies that the U.S. assumption of Afghans’ antiforeign sentiment is not warranted and, for this reason, the United States has made a significant fallacy when forming their policies for the country of Afghanistan and its people.

Share

COinS